Ethiopia’s tribes Bena, Hamar,Karo, Mursi, Suri in Picture

Globalisation and development are impacting heavily on the tribes living in the Omo Valley. Human rights groups fear for their future if they are forced to scatter, give up traditional ways of living through loss of land or the ability to keep cattle

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Some Mursi women choose to wear a saucer lip plate (dhebi a tugoin). A girl’s lower lip is cut when she reaches the age of 15 or 16. The wound is then stretched over time to accommodate a large clay plate

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A woman from the Suri tribe wearing a lip plate paints her face

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Children from the Suri tribe pose in Ethiopia’s southern Omo Valley region near Kibish

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An elderly woman from the Suri tribe smokes a pipe

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Members of the Karo tribe stand by the Omo river. The Karo are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia famous for their body painting. They are also one of the smallest tribes in the region

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Human rights groups fear for the future of the tribes if they are forced to scatter, give up traditional ways of living and lose the ability keep cattle as globalisation and development increase

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Members of the Karo tribe

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Men from the Suri tribe take part in a ‘Donga’ or stick fight near Kibish. Traditionally the fight is a way to impress women and find a wife. The fights are brutal and sometimes result in death. The combatants fight with little or no clothing and sometimes no protection at all

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A Hamar man has his face painted before a bull-jumping ceremony

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Hamar women dance before a bull-jumping ceremony after being whipped by men holding sticks to prove their devotion to them

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A man from the Hamar tribe takes part in a bull-jumping ceremony. Bull-jumping has been practised by the Hamars for thousands of years and is a coming of age tradition. The man has to run across the backs of bulls which have been lined up four times. If he falls he has to start again until he finishes without falling. If the man fails he risks humiliation, being cast out by his village and the prospect of never being able to marry

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A woman from the Bena tribe eats honey collected from a tree. The Bena are a Nilotic ethnic group in Ethiopia and known for keeping bees

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A woman from the Suri tribe carries firewood inear Kibish

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Women from the Mursi tribe pose for a photo in the Mago national park

near Jinka in Ethiopia’s southern Omo Valley

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Young boys from the Mursi tribe walk on stilts. The construction of the Gibe III dam – the third largest hydroelectric plant in Africa – and large cotton and sugar plantations and factories are impacting heavily on the tribes living in the valley who depend on the Omo river for survival.

Source:- https://www.theguardian.com

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